Venison stew, anchovy-garlic cabbage, and butter-fried sweet potato

Venison stew with celeriac and parsnips, split and butter fried baked sweet potatoes, and anchovy garlic cabbage

Venison stew with celeriac and parsnips, split and butter fried baked sweet potatoes, and anchovy garlic cabbage

The last batch of beef stock that I made turned out super gelatinous (this is a good thing) and I’ve been using a quart of it, a few spoonfuls at a time, to braise this and that. There’s some in the venison stew, some in the cabbage. Kevin mentioned this flavor profile to me a few days ago: cabbage with anchovy. Oh, hell yes. And garlic? Indeed. These are a few of my favorite things. Even the cabbage. It’s such an easy vegetable to overlook: it’s cheap and abundant. It’s also nutritious and versatile. I can flavor it with mustard oil, tomato, and cumin, or bacon, onion, and thyme, or like this, with anchovies, garlic, and a few red pepper flakes, and it’s delicious.

These are some sweet potatoes I baked last fall, skinned, and froze. I thawed them, then split them and browned them gently in butter.

The venison stew is as simple as can be, with some parsnip, onion, and celeriac that are all from the winter share. A little wine to deglaze after browning the meat and softening the vegetables, and some more of that thick beef stock.

Beef, kale, and carrots

Kale and collards, carrots, and steak in lavash

Kale and collards, carrots, and steak in lavash

The carrots are part of the penultimate distribution from our winter farm share. The kale and collards are a mix of three different kinds of coles that Kevin pulled from the freezer, all stuff I’ve blanched and put up in seasons past. Some of it was winter collards, and the rest was summer kale. I browned the greens and then steamed them all together with butter and garlic. For the wraps, I seasoned and seared a piece of round steak just rare, sliced it thin, and served it on toasted lavash. I put sauerkraut on mine because lately I’m putting it on everything. I used the pan from cooking the steak to finish the carrots. I added chopped parsley and thyme, and more butter, to the pan, and then tossed the cooked carrots in the pan to finish them.

Bacon cheeseburger

Bacon cheddar burger with sauerkraut and kale

Bacon cheddar burger with sauerkraut and kale

An early dinner tonight. All of last night’s leftover red kale, more butter, and one of the leftover bacon burgers I made this week, topped with melted cheddar and a big serving of sauerkraut. Lately I want to eat salty cured things. There are bugs running and birds singing, and the twilight comes later. These all go together, somehow.

Caribbean-Texan brisket

Beef brisket, red kale, and salt roasted potatoes

Beef brisket, red kale, and salt roasted potatoes

I’m watching a series on Netflix called “How the States Got Their Shapes.” And while barbecue has not actually had any role in the geographic shaping of any American states, the differences among barbecue styles has been noted. Texas barbecues mainly beef, because it’s cattle country, and they prefer a dry rubbed, slow roasted brisket, classically served without sauce. Continue reading

A bit of cassoulet recipe correction and some turnips

Some cassoulet, and a serving of turnips

Some cassoulet, and a serving of turnips

It doesn’t look like much, but the beans, which are creamy, flavorful, are also dense and filling. The turnips also came out good. I cooked those in pork stock and thyme, like the cassoulet.

I forgot to mention an ingredient yesterday when I gave the recipe for this cassoulet. I added about a quarter cup of tomato paste to the warm beans before pouring them into the roasting pan, over the meatballs and pig’s feet, and a few more sprigs of thyme.

Cassoulet recipe

Cassoulet, a slice of crusty bread, and cabbage and carrots

Cassoulet, a slice of crusty bread, and cabbage and carrots

This cassoulet came out so good. I put a lot of thyme into it (and time, and love) and also garlic. Lots of garlic. At least one other food blogger of my acquaintance posted about cassoulet today, and if you’ve ever made this, you know that you can’t just decide at five o’clock that you’re making cassoulet for dinner. Not gonna happen. Not the way I make it, anyway. Continue reading